Category: Multilingualism

The Swiss Italian

Swiss Italian is the name given to the dialect spoken by about 500,000 Swiss in the canton of Ticino   and in the southern part of Grisons (Canton Grigioni). Swiss Italian is also the term used to signify the Italian-speaking autochthonous population in Switzerland. Advertisements

The Swiss German

Swiss German (Schwitzerdütsch, Schwyzerdütch, Schwitzertüütsch, Schwizertitsch) refers to the Alemannic dialects spoken in Switzerland. In 17 of the 26 Swiss cantons, German is the only official language: Aargau, Appenzell Ausserrhoden, Appenzell Innerrhoden, Basel-Stadt, Basel-Landschaft, Glarus, Luzern, Nidwalden, Obwalden, Schaffhausen, Schwyz, Solothurn, St. Gallen, Thurgau, Uri, Zug, Zürich.

The Suisse Romand

(©wikipedia, Savoyerli) The Suisse romande or Romandie is the French speaking part of western Switzerland. It inlcudes the cantons of Fribourg, Geneva, Jura, Neuchâtel, western Valais, Vaud and the northern part of Berne (cfr. Jura Bernois or the Bernese Jura).

About OPOL

Embed from Getty Images In articles about bilingualism and OPOL we usually find two different labels: “one parent – one language” or “one person – one language” which, in my opinion, is a bit misleading. The term of OPOL was first introduced by the french linguist Maurice Grammont […]

My home are my languages

For my first post I took some inspiration from other blogs I’ve followed. A particular one caught my interest, which felt like having written it myself. – It was a post from Annabelle wondering what her daughter would consider to be her home and language when asked “Where are […]